Friday, August 3, 2012

How's the Reading Going?

Can you believe that we are one month away from the beginning of the semester? The above image is of URI's Director of Gender and Women's Studies Jody Lisberger relaxing on Block Island. As you can see, she has her copy of Tracy Kidder's Mountains Beyond Mountains. Many faculty, including Dr. Lisberger, will be crafting assignments using Kidder's narrative--if you haven't picked up the book, now might be a good time to do so. Gender and Women's Studies, better known by its acronym GWS, has a vision of a world free from sexism, and that means other issues--including national chauvinism; class, ethnic, racial, and heterosexual bias; economic exploitation; religious persecution; ageism; and ableism--need to be examined alongside that concern. How do the concerns of GWS fit with Farmer's vision of fair and equitable medical treatment for everyone? How does your first assignment--to think critically about how individuals in wealthier nations might or might not be responsible for people in poor countries--coincide with the mission of GWS? As Christa, an incoming Chemical Engineering student, pointed out: even if individuals do not "have the money to personally donate funds to countries such as Haiti, all of us, who are more fortunate, can certainly donate some of our time, energies, and knowledge to those who can benefit from our assistance." So, what do you think?

75 comments:

Peter Ep said...

Farmer is a interesting character, his fun sense of humor changes the pace of the story. As I read I begin to explore his life & history, feeling the exploration of one's life is cool sometimes.

Elena Sheehan said...

I agree. Also thorough his life one can explore the history and life of the countries that he visits. I like reading about the country and it's people. It keeps the read interesting and it's not all just about Farmer.

Elena Sheehan said...

I agree. Also thorough his life one can explore the history and life of the countries that he visits. I like reading about the country and it's people. It keeps the read interesting and it's not all just about Farmer.

Maryam Attarpour said...

Reading this book has made me feel inspired. I have always been interested in topics such as oppression and women's rights because I come from a country that is saturated with such issues. Reading about Dr. Paul Farmer, and his ideas was very enlightening. We as people who are more fortunate have a duty to the rest of the world that are not as fortunate. Imperialism and exploitation of the poor have always been part of history, but that doesn't mean it should continue to be this way. The western hemisphere and countries that are more fortunate are usually the root cause of the problem. International policies and "acts of kindness" towards countries such as Haiti or Peru are sometimes the catalyst for some epidemics that occur. Example being the account of events mentioned in the book that occurred in Peru with MDR TB and WHO's DOTS policy. But, with that point being made, we need to consider what Mr. Goldfarb had stated in special meeting they had on TB in April of 1998 in Boston because it stills applies to us today. Do we consider the number of people we can help, or, the patient by patient methodology that would sacrifice a cause as a whole because we would use all of the financial resources we have? To fix this problem, we need to fix financial issues that these countries have and stop exploitation and political injustice.

Alex Zygmunt said...

Prior to reading this book, my mentality was that each country’s problems were its own responsibility. Tracy Kidder and his writings through the eyes of Dr. Paul Farmer have greatly altered my view of wealthier countries and their involvement with poor countries. In America, Tuberculosis is preventable and treatable; therefore it was unknown to me that this was such a problem in other countries. What I found interesting (yet disturbing) was that Peru’s DOT plan was not only ineffective, but only making matters worse. The government rejected Farmer’s way of thinking, much like Haiti did during the reign of junta. Farmer clearly decided to make his sole purpose in life to save the lives of the not so fortunate. He could very well have simply become a successful and wealthy doctor in America. It appeared to me that these countries, some of the time did not even want him and the PIH, and unjustly suspended them. Dr. Farmer should be considered a “hero among men” for dedicating his life to this cause.

Organizations such as the PIH give us a prime example of why there should be more U.S. involvement in the healthcare of foreign countries. The PIH is a privately funded organization. Government funding needs to be available for these types of programs. If the U.S. has the technology and funding, our country could easily be making strides to aid in the health and wellbeing of our fellow, yet less fortunate humans. What took me by surprise was how easily most of this is prevented. Aiding in healthcare does not necessarily mean putting up hospitals and sending down doctors that believe in this cause. All it has to mean is giving these people something as simple as clean water to drink, or good food to eat. If a country as well off as the U.S. ignores a problem in another country, there will, in turn, be no solution.

Spencer Whittaker said...

Although Dr. Farmer is doing good work in Haiti I still think thatwealthier countries have no responsibility to poorer countries. If you recall in the book Farmer was a highly respected doctor in the US and there were a lot of people who needed him. This shows that no matter how wealthy a country is there are always going to be people who need help in that country. For that reason I think that wealthy countries should focus there resources into helping the people of there own country before they help other nations.

Jill Sylvia said...

Hi I'm Jill and I'll be a marine biology major. I too thought every country for themselves before reading this book, but that has deffinatly changed throughout it. Farmer helps people in Haiti and other poorer nations not just for attention and admiration, but honestly does it to help cure TB, Aids, and other serious diseases because he believes just one person can make a difference. Even though he has a family of his own, he is helping people so they too can have families and stay together. When praised by the people, Farmer often gets embarrassed and thinks its funny how they think he is some sort of god. I know understand theses people have no clue as to what infections they have and why they have them. They are so greatful for help and understanding and I never thought it would be that way. Many people in this nation turn their heads to what is going on in other parts of the world, possibly because they too are naive or they don't have the courage or will power to help the poor like Farmer does.

Kara Fadden said...

Hi I'm Kara and I agree with Jill. Dr. Paul Farmer did not do anything that he did for attention from people in America or people in the Countries that he is helping, he does it because he cares. I thought that it was funny when one of Farmer's friends said something like "you are the poorest rich man I know". Again Farmer does not do anything that he does for money, he does not work at the Brigham a lot and that is where he actually gets paid. Also Farmer has a family of his own but makes sure that he takes care of the people who need help in the countries that he visits. I think that Farmer and his team are amazing people that care about the sick and will do anything they can to get them better. For example when the little boy John was going to be brought to American Serena was willing to pay the $20,000 of her own money for the plane. I think that it is really important to have people like Farmer and his team in the world to help people in the poorer countries. I feel like if you have the knowledge and the resources to do these kinds of things you should.

Ronny Beaulieu said...

I love how Dr. Paul Farmer was able to understand and interact with Haiti's culture and also was inspired by his immense determination to locate and solve problems within.He is truly a special human being, he was courageous enough to reach out to very poor areas that other people think nothing of. He saw every human being as equal and never judge anyone based on beliefs or social standing, this is truly what made him successful at helping people in need.

Morgan Wynes said...

This is a very interesting book so far. Dr. Farmer has truly devoted his life to helping others. That is something that I believe has been lost in today's society. The world needs more people like him.
I also found the description of his book, "The Uses of Haiti" very interesting. It documents foreign involvment in Haiti with the intention of making Haiti a better place. However as "Mountains Beyond Mountains" shows that is not what has happened. I feel that to truly aid an impoverished country you have to be in touch with the locals of that country. For example, the dam put in on the Artibonite was intended to help the people of Haiti. Instead it supplied power to the wealthy of Port-au-Prince and left the farmers of the central plateau worse off than before. Perhaps if the engineers who had constructed the dam had been more in touch with the people of Haiti a different solution would have been found that would increase the standard of living for the poorest Haitian.

Alex Sabitoni said...

My name is Alex Sabitoni and I am a biology major. I think Dr. Farmer is an extreme example of helping a poor nation. He has spent his whole life making Haiti a better place. I think for an average person sending money to a cause like Farmers is suitable because the money will be easily accepted and will help greatly in making the poor nation stronger. Farmer has isolated himself from the American world with his facility and for every person to do that to help out i think that is a little far fetched. Money or clothing is a great easy way for more fortunate people to help the less fortunate in a poor country.

Emily Desrochers said...

I love how Dr. Farmer has dedicated his whole life to a greater cause. Pauls strong sence of moral justice and his huge heart set him to change the worlds bounty of injustices. This healer did what so many have only drempt of doing; he made the world a better place. Going into college is a big deal, and i have the hopes to change the world as well. Perhaps i will not touch as many lives as Paul, or travel to exotic places and meet with important people, but I will help everyone I can. What I liked about Pauls attitude was that, it doesnt matter how huch you did to help, or what methods you used, as long as you had the genuine intent to help, you couldnt fail and everything you did was helpful. He would write hundreds on thank you notes to doners, and many of these doners contributed less than $100 but he still would treat them with enthusiasm. What i've taken from this book is that from here, all i can do is get better and help more, learn more and grow more.

Alexis Morin said...

I am an incoming Pharmacy major, and before even beginning this book I have tried to live my life the way Farmer does, selflessly giving back to others, hence my career choice. I agree with the statement made in the book that God gives us wealth but does not distribute it, so it is the responsibility of the richer, more educated countries to aid the poorer. If we can not only help them by giving them money and medicine, but teach them how to help themselves, we are benefitting them much more than if we only gave them a short term solution. It's like the saying "give a man a fish and you feed him for a day, teach him to fish and you feed him for a lifetime". All we can do is learn, and we can pass that knowledge onto everyone we meet. I hope to use this philosophy entering college - I want to learn everything I can about what I am passionate about because it will make me a better citizen and therefore let me help others more.

URI Common Reading said...

Hi, my name is Melody Mancinelli and I am a Secondary Education major. I think that we need to focus on perfecting and shaping our own country before we try to fix other ones. Yes, other countries are is much worse conditions and economic standings than we are, but we still have so many people living in poverty. All of the money that is being spent trying to save other countries could be used to help so many people living in our own. Just last year, 2.6 million people fell into poverty, making the number of impoverished people 46.2 million. This is the highest the poverty rate has been in fifty-two years. Also, the median household income fell to levels that have not been seen since 1996. There is so much corruption and turmoil going on in our own country and I feel that this needs to be fixed before we try to save other countries.

Being one of the greatest powers in the word, the U.S. will always feel a sense of responsibility and commitment. I think that our leaders need to realize that our country needs help too. I do think that we should help others to some extent, but the focus should be on our own country. Change comes from within. If the other countries are resilient to change or are not putting in effort then that is when our help should end. If people continue with their old ways, then that is where we should stop. We have different lifestyles and customs in the United States, and as hard as we may try, we will never be able to make other countries view things the same way as we do.

Instead of getting involved in the business of other countries, we need to evaluate our own problems and attempt to fix them. I am not saying we should not help other countries at all, but it needs to be modified. If more and more people are falling below the poverty line in the U.S. each year, what happens when we no longer have the funds to support ourselves because this money has been given to other countries? The countries that we are helping will probably not be able to return the favor. Some people will think that my beliefs are selfish, but I feel that to be successful you must be a little selfish. You cannot please everyone, and I believe that you need to be happy with yourself before you try to make others happy.

URI Common Reading said...

Hi, I'm Nancy Caronia and I'm a PhD candidate in English and work on the Common Reading Program, including the blog posts. I just wanted to say that I'm impressed with the level of engagement in all of your conversations about the book. I'm teaching African American Literature (ENG 248/AAF 248) and Intro. to Gender and Women's Studies (GWS 150--online)this semester and I'll be using the book in my courses for discussion points and assignments. I hope you are all enjoying the end of summer and I look forward to meeting some of you in the classroom or at different school functions!

Lia said...

Hello. My name is Lia Moceri.  I am a Biology/Secondary Education major. 

Paul Farmer, the focus of Tracy Kidder's novel Mountains Beyond Mountains, changes the worlds view of curing infectious diseases and providing public health care, but also redefines service to the poor. Though it was attained largely through donations and grant money, he provided health care for the deeply impoverished and worked to cure the epidemic of tuberculosis in each area he treated. Farmer saw in his work that illness manifests in poor areas of the world more because of they're lack of basic necessities. While money is being accumulated by the upper class and mansions are being erected by the wealthy, the helpless and ill-fated Haitians, Peruvians, and other races of poor are dying in their roofless, floorless, clean waterless huts, deprived health care because of their inability to pay. In GWS, it is taught that no bias should be acted on simply because of a trait. Though it is not gender being discriminated for or against, the world wide health care outwardly banishes the poor and favors the wealthy. Farmers work proved that when the wealthy or able help the less fortunate, the status quo of this health system can be broken. In fact, one of the messages of Kidder's novel is that as more privileged citizens of the world community, it is our responsibility to help the poor in the way they need it most. Especially with the tuberculosis and HIV epidemics, sacrificing ones own time or money could help save lives. While not everyone can give as much as Farmer did, sacrificing nearly all of his money, time with family, and sleep, it is still our duty to help in any way possible sacrificing just some of what we have. Many people "think all the world's problems can be fixed without any cost to themselves. (Mountains Beyond Mountains 40) However, sacrificing our more widely available resources in first world countries can help people and organizations like Farmer and Partners In Health to stop the social injustice occurring in third world areas. As well as donating to organizations and causes, people, especially in this modern era, can help through spreading awareness. Social media outlets can be used as major tools in spreading and sharing information across the globe in a matter of minutes. With the campaign against Joseph Kony, a video link informing the general population of the issue reached over 92 million viewers.  Therefore spreading the word of medical and other world inequalities among the poor can be the way an average person can do their part if financially donating isn't an option. 

Danielle Federico said...

My name is Danielle Federico and I will be majoring in pharmaceutical sciences in the fall. I completely agree with Christa's assertion above and think that it is so easy for each of us to take the time and maybe spend the day volunteering to help the sick, or donate food or old clothes to a charity. However, while it is at our disposal at any time of the day to reach out to those in need, so few of us (myself included) ever do it. I hope that all the students who read this novel, like myself, at some point in the future will take the time to do something to help someone who needs it the most, rather than just think in their heads "It would be nice if I did this, or if I did that." JUST DO IT! I think we can all agree that Dr. Farmer's story is truly inspiring and he makes you want to actually go out and do something to better the less fortunate. Dr. Farmer is an amazing, genuine man, and the world would be a much better place if there were more selfless people like him in it. From reading his book alone, anyone is able to see the compassionate person he is. Dr. Farmer has shown me how the smallest act of kindness can better someone or something in some way. He inspires you not only to go out and want to help the poor or sick, but also to become a better person. From his story I have learned to appreciate all that surrounds me. We are so blessed to live in a plentiful, rich country, where we so often take the smallest things for granted. I have learned to complain a little less and appreciate a whole lot more.

Furthermore, Dr. Farmer would be a fantastic advocate for the GWS, simply because he treats everyone he comes into contact with equally. Never does he ever talk down to a patient he is treating or even a co-worker by his side. Additionally, a man who dedicates his life to helping those who are less fortunate, without thinking how it may benefit him, without question, is one that abides by the views of GWS. Dr. Farmer never holds back from helping people based on race, ethnicity, or even gender. He treats anyone and everyone with respect and opens his kind heart up to whoever may need it. It is this mindset that not only individuals must endure, but entire countries as well. Instead of always trying to get ahead and pay no mind to less fortunate nations and people alike, it is crucial that we all learn to stop and take the time to benefit what surrounds us near and far, and not only ourselves.

Matt Hermenau said...

Hi I'm Matt and i will be a pharmacy major. What i enjoyed most about reading this book was the fact that Farmer, a single person, was able to accomplish so much and help so many different countries virtually asking for nothing in return. He slowly but surely raised his program in Haiti, and to see what it eventually transformed into is truly amazing. I do in fact believe countries with better resources and more technology in medicine should help lesser countries such as Haiti, Peru etc. Not only does it makes sense to contain such diseases these people are suffering from, but also to realize that they are human beings just like us and deserve treatment equal to people in more wealthy countries . A majority of the time Haitians, Peruvians and other locals from similar countries with these handicaps don’t have the necessary drugs/equipment, money and overall living environment that would aid in the recovery of the disease. After reading the book i felt so motivated, and that i should be using my abilities to help out people that are not blessed like us to have the basic necessities of life: food, shelter, hospitals and many other things. Dr. Paul Farmer, his staff and close friends contributing have truly set a precedent for many people in the medical field to follow and I am eager to see such a positive future.

Zack Charette said...

Even though this is nonfiction, the book reads like a novel, mostly because Kidder develops Farmer with so much depth. In regard to the question, I can see both Spencer and Jill's perspective. We commonly think that Farmer has no obligation to extend himself to such lengths as described in the book. However, I'm sure his response as to why he does this would be that he feels obligated. In society, we sometimes fail to assess the true meaning of wealthy nations and poor nations. I've had conversations with groups of people who argue that the United States is a poor nation now because unemployment has been above 8%. some individuals fail to see these terms in a global spectrum. I myself admit to being narrow-minded in this sense. Kidder's book shows us what a poor nation really is. He shows us their dire need of assistance from more developed nations like the United States. So, perception and interpretation are instrumental in accurately answering the question. The prompt does not ask whether the United States is responsible for Haiti. It asks if empowered individuals have a responsibility to assist poor, ailing nations . The answer to the latter undoubtedly is yes. If an individual, such as Farmer, or a nation, such as the US, sees its opportunity to do a service to mankind, it should absolutely move forward with it.

Katrina Thornley said...

While reading this novel I wondered what it would be like if there were more people like Farmer in today's world. If there were perhaps some of the diseases that plague less fortunate nations today would not exist. America knows how to treat many of these illnesses already but we have not helped other nations as much as we should.

Unknown said...

After reading this book, I realized that it's our responsibility to help the less fortunate. Farmer has shown me that the less fortunate deserve proper health care as much as anyone else. He devoted his whole life for anyone in need. Farmer truly shows how much one man can impact the world. This book inspires me to help the people who need it the most.

Nicole said...

My name is Nicole and I am majoring in Communication Disorders. This novel was an outstanding example of showing that one person is able to make a difference to help the world become a better place. I agree with Melody’s comment saying that we should focus on helping those in our country before helping those in other countries. I believe this because I think we owe it to our country to fix our problems before helping other countries fix theirs. I believe that if we focused more of our time on our country’s poverty, that we would be a more powerful country and would be able to then help nations who are in worse conditions than us. Either way, whether it is helping those in poverty in the United States, or helping those in other countries, it is still a good deed being done that can significantly change many people’s lives.

After reading this novel, I realized that humanity has a responsibility to help those in need in any way they can. Farmer was a remarkable man because he went to numerous countries to help out others to the best of his ability and sacrificed things in his own life to do this. I believe that everyone can follow from his example in his or her own way. In order to help those less fortunate there are other things that can be done besides going to other countries to fulfill them. However, many people say that they are going to participate in these things but they don't actually do it. After reading everything that Farmer was able to accomplish on his own, it reminds me that I need to do my share too. The message that Farmer shares to us in the book Mountains Beyond Mountains is expressed in numerous ways everyday. We have been taught in school to get involved in clubs and other activities to help out the community, we have been taught not to pollute, and to donate to charity. When I finished reading this novel, it reminded me of hearing this same message in the song “Man in the Mirror” by Michael Jackson when he sings, “If you want to make the world a better place, than look at yourself and make the change.” I am hoping to make a change and I know that if we all truly try and do our share that we can all make that change and make a difference in the world.

Mariah Levinson said...

Hi, I'm Mariah and I am a political science major. This was a nice change of pace from the books I normally read. People could say Farmer was selfish for the way he acted at times. He always put work before family/love, but he is the most unselfish-selfish person (I know that doesn't make much sense). He put the sick before himself and made sure they also came before anything else in his life. It was truly inspiring to read this book, the best part is that this man actually exists. Hopefully I can make a fraction of the impact he did.

LilyS said...

This book brought up the interesting subject of epidemics after social upheaval. I thought this subject was interesting becuse when I think about the aftermath of social change or upheaval I never had considered something like an out break of an illness or a medical epidemic as a result. It would be interesting to see if this is a recounting pattern I history when there is violent or even peaceful social shift.

Bintou Camara said...

After reading parts of everyone's comments, I'd say that I agree with most of it. I am a nursing major, so everything Farmer did is utterly inspiring. Before reading it, I often had thoughts of traveling the world to help cure/control disease for those who do not have to money and power themselves to do it. I wanted, and still do, to be an advocate of the people. I mean that's a big part of nursing anyway, so it goes hand in hand. The different ideas Farmer and others brought up, are ones I wouldn't even have thought of; and I'm grateful for that. Farmer's personality, his dexterity, charm and complete dedication to his work and people is what made him who he is. Even though I haven't finished the book yet (I'm in part four) I can see why Farmer took on the many challenges that he had, it was because no one else would. For example that one American doctor who worked with Farmer for some time. When it was his time to return to the states, he was more than willing to leave because of the conditions of Haiti. I wish I remembered what page or chapter this cam from... But that man's mindset is just a general perspective of the general human population. Like "why should I be here in a place were people are constantly dying, when I could be at home with my family and friends playing games and going out to eat?!" It may not be intended selfishness, but it's what Farmer avoided.

Anonymous said...


This book caused me to think about things that made me uncomfortable. The fact is that Americans have a more comfortable life, in the sense of having physiological and medical needs, than people in other parts of the world. Yes, we still have our own set of issues but most of the time they are issues of comfort not survival. I never really took the time to dwell on how fortunate that makes me.
Individuals in wealthier nations who are able to support their own basic needs are responsible to help people in poor countries. I am not saying that everyone should be like Farmer or should give up the luxuries they have worked hard for. Individuals in wealthier nations should help make the lives of people in poor countries in one-way or another. This could me donating money, time, or personal services. Everyone on this earth deserves to have their basic needs met therefore those who can should give at least a little to those who cannot help themselves meet their own basic needs.

Anonymous said...

Hi, my name is Alisha Robarge and I'm an anthropology major. I think the best thing about this book was that it made me uncomfortable. It made me think about the fact that we lead comfortable lives while there are so many people that suffer. It made me more aware of how good my life actually is and thankful for everything I have. I think that it is great that there are large organizations that are trying to help countries in need but I think it would be more effective if there was a collective committee. I always believed that as human beings we need to look out for each other. If one group is suffering we should all try to do our part to help relieve their suffering in some way, Whether it's dedicating your life to the cause like Dr. Farmer, making others aware of the situations in less fortunate areas or sending monetary donations regardless of amount. I believe that all humans deserve the basics of human survival, and that it is our duty to help meet those needs if for some reason they are unable to do so.

Anonymous said...

Hi, my name is Alisha Robarge and I'm an anthropology major. I think the best thing about this book was that it made me uncomfortable. It made me think about the fact that we lead comfortable lives while there are so many people that suffer. It made me more aware of how good my life actually is and thankful for everything I have. I think that it is great that there are large organizations that are trying to help countries in need but I think it would be more effective if there was a collective committee. I always believed that as human beings we need to look out for each other. If one group is suffering we should all try to do our part to help relieve their suffering in some way, Whether it's dedicating your life to the cause like Dr. Farmer, making others aware of the situations in less fortunate areas or sending monetary donations regardless of amount. I believe that all humans deserve the basics of human survival, and that it is our duty to help meet those needs if for some reason they are unable to do so.

Samantha Ireland said...

Hi my name is Samantha Ireland and I am a double major of elementary education and communicative studies.

As I read through some of the posts on this blog, I realized that everyone had a slightly different reaction to this novel. Some posts were about feeling inspired while others shared how it changed their views on how countries should or should not help one another.
Before reading this novel, I thought all counties should help one another because I believe that helping each other out is important and is necessary for a successful society to exist. Without support both financially and emotionally, I do not understand how any country whether small or large could survive without the help of its other nations. The national trading system is a perfect example of how countries rely on one another so success can be reached. I don’t think that countries should give away everything they have but, in my opinion, wealthier nations have a duty to financially and emotionally support countries that need it. Every bit of money donated from wealthier countries helps the countries that are financially struggling and living in poverty in the effort of surpassing poverty.
I believe that wealthy countries need to visit countries that are in poverty to help build and demolish areas that are in vital need of improvement so the country can be kept safe for the people who live there. I believe that it is the responsibility of wealthier nations to express sympathy and a sense of responsibility for poor countries.
Furthermore, I agree with the statement posted by Maryam Attarpour: "Reading this book has made me feel inspired". Farmer’s dedication to Haiti inspired me because he followed his dreams allowing nothing to get in his way. He was extremely dedicated to his patients and due to the fact that I want to be a teacher, I want to strive to be equally, if not more dedicated to my future students. He inspired me to believe that no matter what obstacles you face to never give up on your dreams whether that dreams is an occupation, love, or anything else you may want to be a main part of your life. Overall, the main message I took from this novel was: figure out what you want and once you figure that out, do whatever it takes to make those dreams possible while also helping those who are around you.

Anonymous said...

My name is Ben Kuhar and I am a Pre-Health student. Helping others less fortunate is always something that is on my mind. I think that it is pretty amazing how Dr. Farmer is so unselfish. He is willing to give up all his time in order to bring aid to others who need it. He truly fits the definition of a humanitarian in every regard. His willingness to help others in need is a trait that everyone should have.

Anonymous said...

Hi my Name is Danielle and I am an education major. When I first heard about this book, I got a lot of mixed reviews. But after reading it, I came to my own conclusion. It is showed to inspire people and show the readers that there are people in this universe who aren't selfish and who do think of others before themselves. It talks about disease, and although we are able to prevent and cure most diseases, I think that it could get even better if people were more revolved around helping others and not just themselves.

Michael Vittori said...

My name is Michael Vittori and I’m and incoming freshman who will be majoring in pharmacy. After reading Kidder’s book, Mountains Beyond Mountains, I have come to the firm conclusion that wealthier nations should be responsible, in some part, for the well being of the citizens of poorer countries. As Farmer himself states: “the idea that some lives matter less is the root of all that’s wrong with the world” (294). No one chooses to be born poor and disadvantaged. A great deal in our lives depends on sheer luck. Citizens of wealthier countries must come to realize that all people, regardless of the circumstances into which they are born, deserve the same opportunities to thrive. As the lucky few, we have a moral duty to aid citizens of poorer countries. This obligation to help is compounded by the fact that many third world countries are simply unable to develop on their own because of a lack of resources or poor management. Their predicament, moreover, is often a direct result of the actions, past and present, of wealthy nations, as was the case with Haiti.
Granting aid is not only the morally correct thing to do, but the socially, economically, and politically smart thing to do. By helping less fortunate countries, wealthy countries benefit by gaining the trust of these nations, which in turn may lead to new trade opportunities or economic partnerships. Economic success in struggling countries can lead to a higher standard of living for the population and greater political stability throughout entire regions. Investing in foreign aid is an effective way to ensure our own security at home and abroad. Putting money to work wisely for the good of struggling populations can even result in lower costs in the long term. Aid missions aimed at controlling disease, such as Farmer’s project in Lima to combat MDR tuberculosis, are especially effective. Not only can they save thousands of lives, they may also save millions of dollars that would need to be spent if a disease were to become an epidemic. Simply put, richer nations can do well by doing good.
While it is obvious that the vast majority of citizens of wealthy countries cannot follow in Farmer’s footsteps directly, we may all ease the suffering of those living in poor countries through donations of money or time, however small they may be. The Partners In Health organization is an excellent model of how aid should be given to destitute countries such as Haiti. While certain members of the PIH team, including Farmer and Jim, directly aid those in need, most help in a less drastic, but nonetheless necessary way, by raising funds, by writing grant proposals, and by filing paperwork among other things.

Elana Peloso said...

I really enjoyed this book. It was interesting to see how my perception of helping poorer nations changed as I read the book. In the beginning I felt that Dr. Farmer had an obligation to help those in need in his own country before helping those in other countries. By the end I saw how much good he was able to Haiti and how many lives he was able to save. I no longer think that you should help your own country first, people are all the same and it shouldn’t matter who you are helping as long as you are helping someone. Unfortunately the majority of our country is not willing to give as much time and care to the poor and most may not be able to give as much money as Serena, but even if people cannot there are other ways in which they can help. By giving their time and spreading awareness they can also be helpful and make a difference in poorer countries.

Elana Peloso said...

I really enjoyed this book. It was interesting to see how my perception of helping poorer nations changed as I read the book. In the beginning I felt that Dr. Farmer had an obligation to help those in need in his own country before helping those in other countries. By the end I saw how much good he was able to Haiti and how many lives he was able to save. I no longer think that you should help your own country first, people are all the same and it shouldn’t matter who you are helping as long as you are helping someone. Unfortunately the majority of our country is not willing to give as much time and care to the poor and most may not be able to give as much money as Serena, but even if people cannot there are other ways in which they can help. By giving their time and spreading awareness they can also be helpful and make a difference in poorer countries.

Hayley Gola said...

My name is Hayley Gola and i am a film media major. After reading this book, i couldn't figure out what i wanted to write about. A big part was that the book made me take a look at my own life and how fortunate i am with my own life, and how much i take for granted, and although we should never feel bad for being so fortunate just because someone else has it worse, we should take the opportunity to help others that are less fortunate, which is exactly what Farmer did in the book.

Farmer proves that not everyone in the world is bad and evil. Many debates about whether or not people are good or evil always end up with the conclusion that people are evil. All they care about is their own self and how they can further themselves in life, but Farmer smashes this conclusion into pieces by completely devoting himself to help others, even if it meant secluding himself from living his own life.

Alex Boucher said...

I think that this book exemplifies 3 things very well. The power of an individual to make an impact, the effectiveness of governmentally regulated healthcare, and how effective we as humans can be when we disregard borders and work as a global entity.

Farmer is an almost fictional character, showing such virtue and selflessness. So much so, that I feel he is hard to match.I also feel that this makes it difficult for the reader to feel a real empathy with him, because he's always that unobtainable goal. He is, however, a fantastic inspiration, and an amazing man.

Devon Sandall said...

I believe that Dr. Paul Farmer's persistance to bring modern medicine and technologies to impoverished nations is, as many people put it, an act of selflessness and a personal trait that he should be admired for. The persistance Farmer has for his passion of healing people is clearly seen in the book when he travels to Peru. Upon arrival, Farmer notices an unusual trend in the patients; they are becoming resistant to their TB treatments and many of them are also suffering from MDR. Farmer becomes upset when he learns that in Peru, treatments for MDR are too expensive. Farmer then devises a treatment plan with the use of second-line drugs to lower the cost of treatment and to ensure that patients with high tolerance levels will be treated successfully.

GWS and Farmer share many of the same traits, believing that everyone should be treated equally-the fortunate should help the less fortunate.

Samantha Scherff said...

religion is mentioned many times throughout the text and the different ways it's talked about and described have made me rethink religion and what it really means. "you want to see where Christ crucified abides today? Go to where the poor and suffering are fighting back, and that's where He is" (79) is a quote that really stuck out to me. I am not a particularly religious person but this really hit me. Some people are just loaded with only evil and awful experiences in their lives, but in the end they are rewarded. And in my experience, most of the people who are unlucky enough to find an awful fate such as those in Haiti are those who deserve it least. I wonder if there were more people like Dr. Farmer in this world who would become the new 'Christ crucified' or take the place of the Haitians? Is it possible to get rid of those conditions everywhere in the world?

Anonymous said...

As many people have mentioned I also thought that wealthier countries should take care of their own before helping the poorer countries. Reading "Mountains Beyond Mountains" changed my view. Dr. Paul Farmer was very respected in America, so he took his talent to the less fortunate countries where diseases such as Tuberculosis could not be cured. He didn't care about the attention he got, all he cared about were the people he was helping. Dr. Paul Farmer shows how one person can make a difference. He had a family, but sacrificed that to save someone else's life. His patients were so grateful of his work. This book was very inspiring.

Anonymous said...

As many people have mentioned I also thought that wealthier countries should take care of their own before helping the poorer countries. Reading "Mountains Beyond Mountains" changed my view. Dr. Paul Farmer was very respected in America, so he took his talent to the less fortunate countries where diseases such as Tuberculosis could not be cured. He didn't care about the attention he got, all he cared about were the people he was helping. Dr. Paul Farmer shows how one person can make a difference. He had a family, but sacrificed that to save someone else's life. His patients were so grateful of his work. This book was very inspiring.

Anonymous said...

For wealthier individuals, loving their neighbors often means helping the poor. And I mean helping not as in giving money to poorer countries. Because of varieties of corruption involved in getting money from one place to another, the poorer countries probably wouldn't end up with very much in the end. And neither do I mean that wealthier countries should go to poorer countries and do things for them, like implement fish farms or found and run hospitals. Rather, I believe that wealthier nations should help poorer nations learn to do things themselves. Sure, wealthier nations may have to provide some materials or resources, but they should also help poorer communities learn how to use the materials for the best results. As a fisheries major, I am particularly interested in helping fish farms grow because fish are very important to the diets of most places, and a reliable fish farm can feed an entire community in a poorer nation. So, using fish farms as an example, I think that wealthier countries should be willing to help poorer nations build a fish farm as well as train poorer nations to use and care for a fish farm. Money can easily fall into the wrong hands. Education is more reliable. I think that wealthier nations should be willing to educate poorer nations, especially on things such as food production and medicine, so that they can be healthier and more self sufficient.

Gabi Sousa said...

Farmer's personality is part of the reason why I actually enjoy reading this book. It's evident from the beginning that he imerses himself in his work and fully dedicates himself to Haiti. I can relate with some of the things he talks about since i also grew up in a third world country. It almost makes me feel homesick at times. I think that Farmer's genuineness is his greatest asset by far.

Anonymous said...

Sara Connors said.....
The way Farmer wants to make a change in the world is inspiring to others and the way he dedicates himself to Haiti is incredible. i think his drive to help others before himself is true dedication to the world. I would hope someday I can make a change/difference as he did.

Anonymous said...

Dr. Farmer's vision of fair and equitable medical treatment for everyone, or the "preferential option for the poor" began during his youth as he was raised in interesting circumstances, neither wealthy nor with a downcast attitude about his social status. Farmer's father introduced him to Haitian culture by having his family pick fruit, replying to their inquisitions, "I'll give you white people" (51). Late, as a doctor, Paul Farmer did not discriminate against any type of person, seeing only medical problems with sure solutions, saying that "the only real nation is humanity." His efforts were all focused towards improving the lives of people in need, not towards improving the lives of specified groups. His unbiased approach to assisting the needy fits exactly with the GWS vision of an unbiased world, and indeed will inspire people to follow in his footsteps.

This same GWS vision coincides with wealthy nations' responsibility for poor countries because in order to put the care of poor nations before oneself is to is to accept all people, no matter what their state of health, nationality, or personality. Indeed acceptance is the key to being motivated towards humanitarianism. It is to hold true to the problems that you are trying to solve, and not trying to solve the problem of ethnic/sexual/medical differences.

In other words, being biased against one or more segmented groups is to automatically be against helping these types of people improve their lives. The GWS works to prevent such biases in order to improve worldwide acceptance. Yet helping those we are biased against can help eliminate persecution and bring all people together in pursuit of a common goal- the goal of GWS.

Shayla Minteer

Anonymous said...

This opened my eyes. The United States is very selfish. It has the technology and medicine to cure most diseases in Haiti. We should use that to help other countires in Haiti. Farmer understood that and was a great man.

Nick Gealoris said...

Mountains Beyond Mountains was a very good read. It makes you realize how good people have it, and how we should not take things for granted. Dr. Farmer was shown giving back to the community and not only helping Haitians, but helping many others as well. This was his life goal and it has definitly been achieved.

Aissatou Cisse said...

Paul Farmer is someone who was not just interested in getting a career. He devoted his life and his life savings to curing people who were not able to take care of themselves and receive help when they were sick. He was committed to health care policies in third world countries especially, Haiti. After reading this book, I realized that when choosing a career, you need to be able to look at what you do as more than a career. You have to be willing to put service before money. I would like to be able to say that I had a positive effect on someone's life, or a made a difference in many people's lives. Because of this, I feel like the book inspired me.

Cassandra Gomes said...

As I began reading this book, I wondered why Farmer was dedicating his entire life to a country and people he barely knows. I wonder why he would voluntarily live in those conditions and go through all the trouble he went through to receive little to no pay and be away from his family. Then I started getting more into the book and realized that to him, it didn't matter how much money he got, or how fancy his hospital was,he was more worried about the health of his patients and sometimes he even just sat with them and listened to them and had a civil conversation with them. Farmer made me feel like there are good people out in the world that even if they had all the riches in the world, they'd give it all up to help someone else who was not as well as situated as him. Before I read this book, I thought that no matter what, it should be every man for themselves, in this case, every country for themselves. After reading about Farmer and his team, and seeing how they interact, how hard they fought, how hard they pushed really had me in awe. It was really inspiring.

Anonymous said...

Dominic Manno said...

Farmer's personality and his efforts toward the Haitians is the main reason why I enjoyed the book. America is selfish because we have the ideas and machinery to cure our people, so why not try to spread them to different countries such as Haiti so they can start curing their sick people.

John Morrison said...

In my opinion, Paul Farmer is a hero. He is a selfless, and kind hearted man who devoted his entire life towards helping others in need. Farmer decided that instead of satisfying his own personal interests, he focused his work on a country and group of people surrounded by poverty and sickness. Throughout the book, Farmers' desire to improve the wellness of others is truly remarkable. His inspirational character and personality is something that all Americans should take note of. Reading this book has taught me what's truly important in life and how all individuals should feel obligated to help anyone out there that is less fortunate. I strongly believe that as a member of a wealthier nation, we hold the responsibility of making sure that people who reside in poor countries receive the proper care and support that all human beings deserve. Unfortunately, poorer countries lack the significant resources that most wealthier nations have, which in return, leads to depression. As a result, we MUST step in and address the issue because regardless of their background, they still deserve the right to be given identical care/treatment. Overall, in order to improve the world as a whole, it requires people to not only take action, but more importantly, it requires people to make sacrifices. Every good thing in life was once merely a thought, so in essence, we must start by planning or thinking of ways of making the world a better place.

Rassmeay Morm said...

Hello my name is Rassmeay Morm and as a freshman, I beleive Dr. Farmer is truly an unselfish and inspiring individual. The courage and perseverance to try and rebuild and restore a nation back together single handily; causes you to re-think and appreciate all the little things in life.Society today is full of selfish and ungrateful individuals. Farmer is Haiti's Superman fighting horrible diseases such as tuberculosis or TB, stricken among villagers and all alike.
Tracy Kidder is an amazing author. This was one of those books where I could not put it down and I would honestly recommend this to anyone of my classmates.

Aimee Colome said...

Hello my name is Aimee Colome. When I first walked into Tracy Kidder's presentation I thought it was going to be boring, but I thought wrong. Hearing stories and looking at the pictures of the family of Haiti was very shocking and devastating to me.I just couldn't believe how many families are suffering when they should deserve a better life. Dr. Paul Farmer and the the people from Partners in Health are helping these families by providing food, building homes, and giving people the treatments that they need. Hearing what Kidder had to say about his trips with Farmer sounds like Kidder was happy that he went with Farmer to help. I am very happy that I attended this presentation.

mikaela walsh said...

My name is Mikaela Walsh and when i first began to listen to Kidder's speech I thought it would be very boring. Parts of the book were dry, but overall the story was very inspiring and eye opening. Farmer was an amazing person who put everyones else needs before his own. He helped so many people who would otherwise not have a chance at a longer, healthier life. The fact that this book was a true story made it better to read, because you knew he had a real impact on real people. More people should devote time to others who are less fortunate and not as lucky as them to live a healthy life with clean clothes and food everyday. If everyone worked as hard as Farmer, or even half as hard as we did, so many people living in less fortunate countries would have their lives changed. Not everyone has the money to send over to help others, but we all have two hands and time to go help them in a way that money can't buy.

Patricia Kloza said...

After watching Kidder's speech his quest with Dr. Paul Farmer really came alive and I finally understood in full what experiences they both had together. I really enjoyed how he provided his audience with pictures of both children and adults with the diseases such as AIDS and tuberculosis.
Dr. Farmer is truly and amazing human being and he never once gave up with trying to help the people of Haiti. His experiences show me that I am privileged to live the life I live and I should not take for granted what I have.

Daniel Magill said...

Watching Mr.Kidder's presentation helped me realize the reality of Mountains Beyond Mountains. I was getting bored with the book, but while he was talking more in depth about the novel I became more interested. It is people like Farmer who give me hope in this world. He gave the best he could for people who couldn't afford it even though he didn't need to. I realized that I have so much to offer to the underprivileged. If everybody helped even a little bit, we can make a huge difference.

Steven said...

"Mountains beyond Mountains" has opened the eyes of many on current issues such as health care and human rights. What I was most intrigued by this book was Farmer's idea of living standards or basic human necessities that everyone should be entitled to by birth. The saying goes "All men are created Equal" but after reading the book, it's hard to believe. Myself growing up in a well-to-do family in America have been given the rights to fresh water, food, health care, and opportunity. It should be expected for every person to have these things.

Madeline Levesque said...

Most of the books I've had to read for school involving some sort of "hero" have been ego boosting self-biography's. Mountains beyond mountains is nothing of the sort. I enjoyed kidder's take on farmer and his work. He appears to be the sort of guy you'd sit next to on the train and be delightfully surprised by his humor and efforts around the world. Along with his avoidance of any ego stroking comments. Great book,lovely man. Kudo's to kidder for sharing him with us.

Monique D said...

Farmer was an interesting guy who has helped many. His story was very inspirational. I loved reading about the people Dr. Farmer helped. The reading was interesting everytime he went to a new country.

Robert Bercaw said...

I sincerely hope that message presented in this story is taken seriously. Perhaps i'm just jaded, but it seems that many people, after reading a story of this sort, think to themselves "Oh, what a nice man" and then go about their lives unaffected. Many sate the nagging feelings of responsibility to the less fortunate by convincing themselves that awareness is a viable form of charity. We live in the modern age, a global age, where vast compendiums of information are accessible to many at the slightest whim. Awareness of an issue doesn't constitute charity. Paul Farmer presents the idea of global citizenship, of people having at least some degree of responsibility for every other person in the world. Global citizenship is the key to egalitarian society, and just creating a better place worldwide. I hope to make some positive impact on the world as a whole, and I believe that if the majority of people have this mindset, and are willing to carry out this goal, even on a small level, the world really can be changed for the better.

Molly MacDonald said...

After reading the book and attending the presentation by Mr. Tracy Kidder, I feel more educated on global health issues. Dr. Paul Farmer, along with four friends, started a worldwide health mission to improve the lives of those who are readily forgotten. I found it inspiring that Dr. Farmer set out to improve the world in whatever ways he could, and did not look for accolades or notoriety.

Carley Prokop said...

Throughout Mountains Beyond Mountains, I grew a fond connection to Dr. Farmer and really began to appreciate him as person. The way he would put himself into jeopardy to help those less fortunate in Haiti, Peru and Russia was simply inspiring. Farmer was not only a doctor that would help the sick, but he would help the sick in a way that they would remember, in a way that made them happy. He developed personal connections with his patients and it was very apparent that the patients felt this connection too. My favorite instance of this was "Joe." Farmer listened to Joe's request and found him a room at the hospital where he could drink his six pack of Bud, while still staying warm, eating and getting the necessary drugs to heal him. Examples like this simply wouldn't fly in America, with a typical doctor.

As inspiring and considerate as this is, I can't help but think why people like Farmer aren't in America. What possessed Farmer to go to other countries instead of fixing the problems right inside our own country. There are plenty of states and cities filled with ill people who don't have the ability to receive the treatment they need. A part of me can't help but disagree with Farmer and support the healing of the people inside America. After all, this is our home and what happens here reflects each and every one of us whether we recognize it or not.

So, after reading this novel. I am torn.

Anonymous said...

armer is a very caring and generous man who tries to help out as many people as he possibly can. Even though he can't donate money to everyone in Haiti, he still donates his time and effort into helping them get back on their feet. This is the best book in the world!!!

Michael Gilbert

Anonymous said...

i think this is a great book to read. it talks about community and the people in it, farmer, i thought was a nice character.Mountains beyond Mountain is a book that i will definitely recommend to others to read.

Anonymous said...

It took me a while to really get into the book, but once i got towards the middle, i realized how interesting this story really was. I really enjoyed chapter 5 because we learned why Farmer has this devotion to helping out Haiti. Farmer didn't have an easy childhood; his family moved around a lot and it was getting hard to afford many things. This is probably why he sees that money doesn't buy happiness. He's happier helping out a country instead of spending the money that he earned on pointless materialistic items. He has his necessities but that's about it. I also think that Farmer is not full of himself because his father never really congratulated him on any of his successful doings. Even though Farmer finds out that his father was proud of him, his father never physically told Farmer. This is probably one of the reasons why he is not full of himself. When the people of Haiti call him a God, he doesn't believe it, even though he basically is the Haitian's God.

-Cassie Genung

Anonymous said...

I like the contrast between Farmer's life and Haiti. The book obviously is about Farmer saving the country of Haiti, but the reader sees that Farmer's personal life isn't so easy. Ophelia, the love of Farmer's life, couldn't handle coming second to Farmer's love for Haiti. She feels as though she could never compete with it. She understands that taking care of a country is a lot of work, but she just can't handle it. The reader can also see that Ophelia doesn't like the fact that Farmer is basically perfect; everything from what he says to the way he acts. Ophelia ends up saying no to Farmer's hand in marriage. Farmer is a smart and motivated guy, but he's letting his relationships fall apart. He finally finds a woman who can actually deal with the type of life that Farmer lives. She and their daughter live in Paris while Farmer stays in Haiti because his duty in life is to help people in need. Farmer says there are no patients that I could help in Paris. People tell Farmer to go stay in Paris with his family, but he knows he can't. It's sad to see that a man who basically saved the entire country of Haiti can't really keep a healthy relationship.

-Cassie Genung

Kathryn Pfeiffer said...

I like reading about Paul Farmer because he is an inspiration to me. All the work done in Haiti because of him makes me realize that I can also make a difference in the lives of others.

Anonymous said...

Paul Farmer didn't have the best childhood, and that is why he relates to these children. He understands the concept of a hard life, and doesn't want these children to have to go through what he did. He feels that everyone should have fair and equal medicial treatment, and his vision fits the concerns of GWS in the way that there should be equality in this world. Everyone should be created equal, no matter their gender, race, economic status, ect. They both feel that every single human being should get the same rights, and care provided to them.

Anonymous said...

Farmer inspires the reader to help those who are less fortunate. His no-excuse mentality for giving to others rubs off on the reader. Growing up without much money, Farmer learned first hand that success comes from hard work and overcoming the most difficult of obstacles. Even though his family lacked a legitimate home, he was still able to go to college and eventually become a doctor. Most would be satisfied with this amount of success given the challenges he faced, but Farmer kept going and went out of his way and committed to helping people who couldn't get the health benefits they deserved. Mountains Beyond Mountains is a book that inspires and is well worth the read.

Sam said...

In my COM 100 class we learned about cultural communication and how something in one culture like a simple gesture could mean something completely different in another culture. While reading the book it is pretty amazing how well Paul Farmer can pass from one culture into another so seamlessly. He works in the US, Haiti, and Peru and also lives in France but he is able to relate to his patients in a way that most doctors can't. Especially in Haiti where there is such a strong belief in voodoo he is able to convince his patients to utilize medicine and healthcare while not criticizing their beliefs, he uses these beliefs to help his patients. I think he is able to pass from one culture to another so easily is because he listens to his patients and tries to understand them better so that he can help them the best way that he can.

Nicole Britto said...

I'm writing on this blog for my Communications class and to be honest I read some of this book but not all of it. I just couldn't mange to read the whole thing. The book was just a little boring and it couldn't really hold my interest enough to get through it.

Sydney Duquette said...

I agree with most of the people writing on this blog. I don't necessarily think that every country "owes responsibility" to any other country, but it sounds morally correct that wealthier nations should definatley help out the less wealthier countries in resources. especially the countries that have a surplus of certain resources, instead of being greedy and taking what we don't need, give some of it to the countries who do need it. Before reading this book, learning more about diversity in culture and countries, and joining my Com 100 class, I never thought that it was a big deal if countries didn't help each other out, I thought that every country had a responsibility to itself, but now that I have read this book I think differently.

Sam said...

Before reading this book I did not think that any country owed any other country anything. I thought we should fix problems here before we try to help another country, but after reading this book I have realized how important it is for wealthier countries to help poorer ones. It amazes me that there is someone like Paul Farmer who can give up there entire life to help others and ask for nothing in return. Most people try to get a job where they can make as much money as they can and he could have gotten a job making a lot of money but instead he chose to give up everything for other people. I even think that he may go a little bit too far by not really spending time with his family and putting his health aside.

Anonymous said...

Hello, my name is Devin D’Amico and I am a freshman here at URI. I am also currently in a Gender and Women’s Studies class. The questions asked in the blog are, “How do the concerns of GWS fit with Farmer's vision of fair and equitable medical treatment for everyone? How does your first assignment--to think critically about how individuals in wealthier nations might or might not be responsible for people in poor countries--coincide with the mission of GWS?” The concerns of the GWS fit in with Farmer’s vision of fair medical treatment because he believes no matter what gender or race or social standings someone is, they should received the right medicine and medical care we have to offer. It is not fair to only serve the group that is led to be the superior species. Everyone is equal and should receive fair judgment. The GWS class has made me become more aware of the treatment of women and how our voices need to be heard. Also I commented about “responsibility for other nations” in a pervious blog. I said, “…I believe other wealthier nations do not have the responsibility to help out other poor countries. I also believe that is wealthier nations want to do the right thing, they should help out. People are responsible for themselves, but it is nice to have help sometimes…” I still stand by my opinion.

Anonymous said...

I personally have the same views on this book as Hayley. This book really made me look at what I have and how good my life is. Farmer really did go against the statement that people are evil. He fully committed himself to helping the people of Haiti, no matter what it took. Even though he took himself away from his own personal life I can guarantee that many more people would have died without him.

Anonymous said...

I agree with Devin that "people are responsible for themselves, but it's nice to have help sometimes". I fully support the idea of equality, whether it be racial, gender based, or moral. Change must be self initiated. People cannot expect assistance every time a situation gets hard. We must learn to help ourselves before we can ask for help from others. Nobody is going to want to help you if they think that you are not capable of achieving your goals on your own. In order to receive the kindness that comes with outside aid, you must show that you deserve it.

Search This Blog

Loading...