Thursday, July 12, 2012

What's Your Big Idea?

Hello again, Class of 2016! This is just a friendly reminder that you are able to post at any time regarding Mountains Beyond Mountains. The first member of Class of 2016 has begun the conversation with our first posting. Your assignment, after reading (or beginning to read) Tracy Kidder's Mountains Beyond Mountains is: “What responsibilities do you think individuals in wealthier nations have towards people in poor countries? What do you think is the best way to express or act on this sense of responsibility?” Mara, an incoming biomedical engineering major, suggested that discovering where one's passion is may be the most important factor in taking responsibility. What do you think? Also, if anyone is having difficulty posting, please email newram@etal.uri.edu. Place in the subject line Common Reading Blog!

248 comments:

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Nicole said...

Hi everyone!
My name is Nicole Proulx, and I am a nursing major. I believe that as human beings, a personal responsibility we all share is helping those who are less fortunate than us. There are too many people in the world who are not being helped enough, and too little of people willing to help those in need. The best way to express or act on this sense of responsibility is to do everything in our power to make a difference. Whether we go to the actual country as Farmer did, or if we just put together care packages with a small group of friends; either way we are making a difference and providing care to those who need it the most.

Deborah Bracewell said...

Hi, my name is Deborah Bracewell and I am a first year nursing major student. Well I think that individual in wealthier nation should help people in poor countries, but it is not a responsibilities of their. People do thing from the good of their heart and when they feel like giving. Wealthier nation should help poor nation in educating and supporting them, just spending money to help a poor country does not always work because the government of many poor country is very corrupted and most of the time money that is spend from wealthier country does not get to the citizen in these poor countries. I know how it is to live in a country where the government take everything that is meant for the citizen and keep it for themselves, I born in Liberia and growing I watch this first hand. The most important thing wealthier countries can do is go to these poor countries and help the people there like Dr. Paul Farmer did , that way it will be more hands on (educating children, building schools, hospital, etc.) and the people will get the help they need. Money does not always solve everything, volunteering and actually being there means a lot than giving all the money you have. Our time and help can do what money can do sometimes.

Anonymous said...

Hi my name is Stephanie. My belief that nations that are in need should have the sense of security that wealthier nations will step in to help out. Poorer nations also deserve the same type of help as any other nations. When it all comes down to it all, forgetting any factors of race, ethnicity, religion, etc., we all need someone to lean on once in our lives. Helping those who desperately in need raises a nations moral and values towards human beings life's. One hand washes the other, so helping those in need will turn into good karma coming back around for the entire nation as a whole. Besides, we all occupy the same planet, why not all work together so that every nation is equal economically! Farmer is a motivating character that inspires such good deeds that everyone should endure in.

Maggie Dufault said...

After reading Mountains Beyond Mountains I have learned a lot about poorer countries like Haiti and how the United States and other wealthier countries could help out to prevent the drastic poverty and sickness that is in these countries. I don't however believe that just sending money over to the countries would actually help. The countries are in need of food and supplies, sending money would feed the government which isn't helping the countries already. The people in the wealthier countries could help by donating non-perishable food items to the Red Cross or help to raise money for the medical supplies that are needed. Like Paul Farmer does in Haiti, getting grants and such to help pay for the medicines that the people need for treatment. There are a lot of options for the individuals in wealthier countries to help out, if they wanted to.

Lauren Komitor said...
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Lauren Komitor said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lauren Komitor said...

Hi, my name is Lauren, and being a nursing major, I found that I was somewhat moved by Dr. Paul Farmer's work throughout both the novel, and his life as well. From the beginning of the novel, Farmer could be easily characterized mainly by his work itself due to his pure dedication and his basic selflessness. Through the progression of the novel, there was a growing distinction in showing how his personal life held less importance to his own priorities, where his work in Haiti was valued with more importance.
I found Farmer's work to be very inspirational to say the least bit, for he truly did dedicate his life in trying to make the most instrumental difference, that he had the power to do. Donating not only his time and his money, he did make much improvements to this third world country. Having a somewhat similar experience of traveling to help the less fortunate, I think that being a "wealthier nation", that we have an advantage to aid those who live in such conditions that people today would not even imagine of. Participating in Habitat for Humanity over the summer in Robbins, Tennessee, was one of the most rewarding experiences of my life so far. Being able to travel to Tennessee, I felt that I had the resources where I wanted to give back to a community that do not have luxuries, let alone necessities.
Tracking back to Farmer's work, he was a basic representation of a true advocator in helping third world countries regarding basic health care, living conditions, secondary education and much more. He began dividing his personal life in basic schedules of staying in Haiti, and traveling back home. It didn't take long until his time in Haiti became more of a home to him, for the time he resided there outweighed the time he spent in the United States. He was physically and mentally invested in the improvements he sought to give to Haiti; being this hands on source of help for the people and their country. His selfless character is something that isn't seen today in society, mainly because his work was done out of pure passion, not expecting a reward for such work. He was dedicated to the people and the cause, which made Farmer such a special kind of individual.

Corynne Bielecki said...

Individuals in wealthier nations have a huge responsibility towards people in poor countries. We all live on this Earth together, and have a responsibility to work together as nations to make the world prosper and advance. Some countries, however, do not have the financial ability and medication to cure their patients, and it is our duty to help them out. This is evident in the book, Mountains Beyond Mountains. Author Tracy Kidder writes about doctor Farmer’s adventures to poorer countries that are in need of medical help. For the most part, he voluntarily goes to countries such as Haiti and Peru to give them medical assistance since they don’t have the money to help their people get better. It is so important to help less fortunate countries so that as a whole, the world can advance and grow together.
The best way to act on this sense of responsibility is to create world-wide organizations that aim to help any country in need. The book mentioned the World Health Organization (WHO) that sets certain medical standards and has the funding to help countries that are not as medically advanced as others. Farmer also established “Partners In Health” that accepted donations and spent them on medicine and medical facilities for the countries he visited that were in dire need for medical assistance.

KS 91 said...

Hello, my name is Kyle Sirois, I'm a freshman majoring in Kinesiology here at URI. Although wealthy people do have a right to do whatever they please with their money, I believe the more fortunate should feel responsible to help and try to enhance the life of those who are less fortunate. It's a very difficult situation because if any person just tries to send money to the country, the money will 9 times out of 10 just go to the government, and it'll be like you just flushed it down the drain. But, if it was to be sent to an organization such as PIH, in order to help support a man like Paul Farmer, the money would be going to a cause where lives are saved day in and day out, nonstop around the clock. And even if that isn't a possibility, spending money and raising awareness of what goes on around the world, telling about the pain and suffering that controls countries like Haiti, Peru, and Russia, is half the battle. I think that in order to understand what goes on in these countries and before anyone helps support anything, they should either research or visit to see how much they would be making an impact, and how something as simple as water can be so vital and rare for others.

Isabella said...

Hi, I'm Isabella and I have not yet decided on a major. I strongly believe wealthier countries hold a responsibility to share their wealth with the less fortunate. I agree with the students here saying providing money is not enough, and that fortunate nations such as ours need to actively involve themselves in the lives of those they are helping. Farmer's approach of helping his patients one-on-one showed his selflessness and passion towards those who truly needed his help.

Jamie said...

Hi my name is Jamie and I agree with the previous posts. I feel that it is common curtesy for wealthier nations to help the poor ones. Although money is not the answer. I have many friends that have strong church families and they would travel out of the US for mission trips to help build houses, and bring all sorts of supplies for the poor community they were visiting. I have always wanted to go on a mission trip and could never find an alternative as I wasn't a member of my youth group. But reading Mountains Beyond Mountains has made me want to look harder for a way to to do what Farmer had done. I want hands on, personal experience with those who are less fortunate. I don't just want to donate money because I know we as a community can do more then that. I hope to have the opportunity to do what Farmer had done.

Reiley Knight said...

After reading Mountains Beyond Mountains I have come to the conclusion that what Paul Farmer did when he chose his career path was a nobel choice. I believe that he showed people from wealthy countries have the responsibility to shadow and help the poorer countries of the world. Farmer shows nothing but selflessness when curing TB patients in Haiti with little supplies. I believe that money and good schooling as he had can help a person in need but you also need good personal values to do so, as Farmer does in this book. We cannot send millions of dollars over seas to poor countries but we can send people there to help those countries get on their feet and become better places all around. The best way to act on this responsibility is to actually get out there and do something about it not just sit here and talk about. Farmer does not care about what anyone else thinks of him which is something that you need because he is a person that helped poor countries in an important field. So i believe to make a difference and act on this responsibility people just need to care and want to help.

Celeste said...

Hey my name is Celeste and I am a Biological Sciences major. I believe richer nations need to do everything they can to help the poorer nations. This includes actually going to these nations and helping personally, not just donating money thinking it will get to these nations. I think Farmer's approach to helping the poor is the most effective way to reach out to poorer nations. Its good that we have people donating, but people should see where their money is actually going. If people visited these nations, I think that they would feel connected to the situation and be more likely to help again and bring more people with them. That would have been my favorite part of the job if I was in Farmer's shoes.

Sam Poli said...

Hello, my name is Sam Poli and I just want to point out the excellent point Deborah made about how simply throwing money at the problem often results in the already powerful gaining more power, and the impoverished falling deeper and deeper into poverty. This is the same case in terms of food, vaccinations, etc. as corrupt governments will monopolize the supply in order to exert control over the population. In my eyes, this makes Dr. Paul Farmer's actions much more significant as his direct interaction with an impoverished people symbolically challenged the power of corrupt governments in other struggling countries. If something is to be done, direct action is the only possible method of making a difference.

Sam Poli said...

Hello, my name is Sam Poli and I just want to point out the excellent point Deborah made about how simply throwing money at the problem often results in the already powerful gaining more power, and the impoverished falling deeper and deeper into poverty. This is the same case in terms of food, vaccinations, etc. as corrupt governments will monopolize the supply in order to exert control over the population. In my eyes, this makes Dr. Paul Farmer's actions much more significant as his direct interaction with an impoverished people symbolically challenged the power of corrupt governments in other struggling countries. If something is to be done, direct action is the only possible method of making a difference.

Sam Poli said...

Hello, my name is Sam Poli and I just want to point out the excellent point Deborah made about how simply throwing money at the problem often results in the already powerful gaining more power, and the impoverished falling deeper and deeper into poverty. This is the same case in terms of food, vaccinations, etc. as corrupt governments will monopolize the supply in order to exert control over the population. In my eyes, this makes Dr. Paul Farmer's actions much more significant as his direct interaction with an impoverished people symbolically challenged the power of corrupt governments in other struggling countries. If something is to be done, direct action is the only possible method of making a difference.

Max Herrmann said...

People in wealthier nations like the United States, UK, France...etc. should take some responsibility by teaching or giving aid to countries that are less advanced and industrialized than the wealthy ones. If these countries just even took notice to these struggling counties like Haiti, it would better the wel being of their people and their government would structure more smoothly. While I do not think that we are fully responsible for these poor countries, I don't think we need to give them food, supplies, money and things like that but maybe it would be better off if we helped to structure their government or their education systems. It would be the right thing to do if exposed what it is wrong with the country and work on fixing it in the long term as opposed to a short term mend. If people all around the world cared about people who are struggling in smaller less advanced countries and did something about it there would be less of these occurrences.

Mae said...

Hi my name is Mae, and I am currently undecided in my major, however I've always wanted to join the Peace Corps or something of the like with a skill that will help educate people less fortunate than I. Paul Farmer's story is rather eye opening with all the facts about first hand experiences with extreme poverty. It is unfathomable that someone could take on an exponential amount of responsibility of thousands of peoples' healthcare and be so selfless. If everyone had that integrity people would be living a much better life and probably a happier one. Because the majority of the world lives in extreme or near extreme poverty, I feel that the few who live comfortably should feel obligated to help those less fortunate. I think that although we work hard for our wealth and comfortable lifestyle, some people don't even have a chance to work hard. Different conflicts get in the way of their ability to achieve greatness, such sickness, poor living locations, wars, corrupt government etc. It's not their fault they have these challenges preventing them from opportunities that are easier for us to come by. That being said, I don't think people of wealth should take pity or believe they are their saviors by sending a few dollars here and there. To truly help others, people first need to be educated on the country and culture that lies there, then be hands on and fight for a cause. Clearly Paul Farmer knew from early on he wanted to study anthropology then evolved into the medical field to help the people of Haiti, but it's never too late for everyday people to help others.

maria said...

Hey my name is Maria and I am a first year student at URI. I am not a big fan of reading, but only do it if I have to. This book was very interesting and made you think. I like this question a lot because its very important and has been an important question for a whiile. Even though everyone in the world is seperated across different countries, we are all equal and sometimes need help. I believe we are meant to work and interact with eachother because we are all people in one world. We all need one another to keep this world spinning and keep everyone happy. If a wealthier nation has the resources and is capable of helping out a poorer country, they need to do it and if it was the other way around I am sure it would be vice versa. There is many ways how a richer country could help a poorer country. They could send food, build beneficial businesses, sending money, and sending anyother resources that country needs to regain strength and stability. If everyone and everything is working properly then happiness and peace is not hard to have.

Aristidis Koukos said...

Hello my name is Aristidis,
I would like to add my take on this topic. Richer countries should be obligated to donate medicine and technology to deserving countries that require it to sustain life. Paul Farmer in the novel Mountains Beyond Mountains provides the perfect example of one man's determination to help those in need. I particularly relate to this issue coming from a country that is in great financial debt in Greece, countries such as mine do not have the financial capital to provide a constant supply of medicine and care for the ill. Paul Farmer has devoted most of his life to helping other individuals which I believe is a truly honorable deed. As it was described toward the end of part I, Paul Farmer arrived in Haiti and every individual was searching for him to aid them. This demonstrates the power of one man and if an entire country devoted resources to the poorer countries it would truly make a difference in the long run

Colin G said...

I think that if someone is wealthy enough so that money is not a concern to them, they should in fact feel some responsibility to care for those less fortunate. Today, it is easy enough to simply donate money and truly make a difference in peoples lives, so there is no reason not to.

Anonymous said...

Individuals of wealthier nations have certain responsibilities regarding poorer nations. Even though we might think we are too small to make a difference, that is wrong. If everyone is America were to donate even one dollar to a global foundation then we could raise millions of dollars. This money could be used to help out third world countries by building schools, hospitals or any facilities. Also in America it is our responsibility to spread awareness so people notice that there are larger problems in the world. Even though third world problems may not affect us directly, we are humane enough to want to put an end to things like starvation and poverty. In order to act on this responsibility we should start local foundations that in all small communities, then have a foundation that all the money is put towards. This little bit of money from each individual could be the difference between life and death to someone in a third world country.

Baley Rochefort said...

My name is Baley, and I certainly agree that wealthier nations such as ours hold some responsibilty to aid the less fortunate nations, especially when we have contributed to their poverty by blocking assistance to them in the past. Before reading Mountains Beyond Mountains, I may not have said the same thing. However, reading the story of was truly an eye opening experience that allowed me to see from a very different perspective. It would be an understatement to say the actions and devotion of Paul Farmer were inspirational. He not only recognized the poverty in Haiti and cared enough to do something about it, he truly devoted his life to improving the lives of these people. He put himself in their shoes, feeling their pain and struggle just as much as they did. He devoted all of his time to ensuring that they had as much health coverage as possible in Haiti, and then he tackled problems in other countries infected with MDR TB as well. Paul Farmer is an intelligent and selfless human being that stands as a spectacular example of the kind of person everyone should strive to be.

Ian Barrows said...

Dr. Paul Farmer was undoubtedly a wonderful and inspirational individual. He achieved more in the way of changing the world in a few years than many do in a lifetime. He passed on an important message: That those with greater resources can greatly improve the lives of those with fewer resources. Now as to the question, “Do individuals from wealthier nations have responsibilities toward those in poorer countries” I say absolutely. I will quote historical figures and documents – all of which are important to American history and culture – that agree with my statement.
During the Industrial Revolution, when the country was first becoming a real power in the world, there was a huge gap between the rich and the poor. Andrew Carnegie was an incredibly wealthy industrialist. However, in his Gospel of Wealth article he stated that those with great wealth have the responsibility to redistribute their wealth to the lower classes. Carnegie would definitely agree that Americans have the responsibility to assist those with fewer resources.
An important American document will also support this statement. In the Declaration of Independence there is a section that reads:
That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.
This quotation essentially means that those who have the ability to change the state of things have the responsibility to change the state of things. This meaning is supported by the Second Amendment Right to Bear Arms.
As to what should be done in order to follow this line of reasoning, I would suggest that individuals from wealthier nations pool their resources to improve awareness and provide, by our standards, basic health care for those with fewer resources. When middle-class individuals get a bad cut it gets treated and that’s the end of it; when a poorer individual gets a bad cut it gets treated poorly, infection sets in and more expensive antibiotics are required to treat the patient. In other words, if the little injuries get treated early and properly, both the cost and the mortality rate are significantly reduced. Also, wealthier nations should strive to eliminate diseases that tend to exist mostly in poorer populations but can be deadly to anyone who obtains the disease, such as tuberculosis, small pox, whooping cough, etc.

Ian Barrows said...

Dr. Paul Farmer was undoubtedly a wonderful and inspirational individual. He achieved more in the way of changing the world in a few years than many do in a lifetime. He passed on an important message: That those with greater resources can greatly improve the lives of those with fewer resources. Now as to the question, “Do individuals from wealthier nations have responsibilities toward those in poorer countries” I say absolutely. I will quote historical figures and documents – all of which are important to American history and culture – that agree with my statement.
During the Industrial Revolution, when the country was first becoming a real power in the world, there was a huge gap between the rich and the poor. Andrew Carnegie was an incredibly wealthy industrialist. However, in his Gospel of Wealth article he stated that those with great wealth have the responsibility to redistribute their wealth to the lower classes. Carnegie would definitely agree that Americans have the responsibility to assist those with fewer resources.
An important American document will also support this statement. In the Declaration of Independence there is a section that reads:
That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.
This quotation essentially means that those who have the ability to change the state of things have the responsibility to change the state of things. This meaning is supported by the Second Amendment Right to Bear Arms.
As to what should be done in order to follow this line of reasoning, I would suggest that individuals from wealthier nations pool their resources to improve awareness and provide, by our standards, basic health care for those with fewer resources. When middle-class individuals get a bad cut it gets treated and that’s the end of it; when a poorer individual gets a bad cut it gets treated poorly, infection sets in and more expensive antibiotics are required to treat the patient. In other words, if the little injuries get treated early and properly, both the cost and the mortality rate are significantly reduced. Also, wealthier nations should strive to eliminate diseases that tend to exist mostly in poorer populations but can be deadly to anyone who obtains the disease, such as tuberculosis, small pox, whooping cough, etc.

Charlie said...

Hello, my name is Charlie, I am an incoming biology major. I believe that it is the responsibility for those in wealthier nations, who can, to give money and/or their time to poor nations. It is not right to have such civilized nations and still have to worry about people dying of easily curable diseases, like that that is being done in places like Haiti. I believe that people should follow Farmer's message as much as possible. I know it maybe unlikely for many other people to give as much time as he did within the book, but people should at least donate money to well known organizations that are known to use all/most of the money for the purpose they sent it to them for. For those that can help more, they should, through Habitat for Humanities, or even through their very own occupation, such as Farmer did.

Nethania said...

Hello, My name is Nethania Jiminian and I am currently a Biology Major. I feel as though there should be a point in time when everyone should work together to aid the ones in need. Especially with the people in better economic situations, they can be quite selfish and look down upon the people who don't have as much. They have a sense of arrogance to think they are better. They take many things for granted and never think about the less unfortunate and how they struggle everyday. I feel that in order to help those citizens in poorer countries, if perhaps maybe the richer people who waste their money on unnecessary things should ban together to help with volunteering. Just by getting and working together, any little difference can be made to make the situations better than they are actually now.

Lindsey S said...

Much like what has already been stated, I think wealthier countries have a great responsibility in helping poorer countries. If it is already acknowledged that a country is suffering, we, as the superior nation, should do anything to assist them. America does a pretty good job of this already. For example, we have fundraisers targeted to help all different countries and causes. Sure, this isn't the most hands-on, but it's something. We also have a great deal of "volunteer abroad" programs, where you can actually donate your time to helping those in other countries. This is our responsibility as American citizens.

Sam said...

My name is Sam. I think that everyone in wealthier nations has a responsibility to help others that are not as fortunate as us just because of where they were born. Sending money is not the answer because you have no idea where it is going and who it is actually going to. Reading this book I was happy to see that someone has taken it onto themselves to really make a difference, a big difference in that. I'm not saying everyone can and should be like Paul Farmer but the world would be a better place if there were more people like him. I read a similar book for a high school class that focused on women in developing countries and the challenges they face such as being raped my military personnel and not being able to make any money they for themselves because they are women. The problem I had with that book was that no one was really doing anything to help those women. The authors were travelling around documenting and showing what challenges they faced but they didn't do anything nearly as extraordinary as Paul Farmer. Reading both of these books inspires me to do something and travel and see for myself what is going on in developing countries and try to help.

Irina said...

Hello my name is Irina and I am a biology major here at URI. While reading Mountains Beyond Mountains I noticed that a major theme is how this one man, took on such an exemplary role of helping Haiti and other poor nations that had no hope, were ignored by mainstream society but he not only donated money to medical interventions but spent his life helping these people firsthand. It is our role as members of wealthier nations to not ignore the third world countries or just donate some money and think that we've done our job, we must take action and get to know these people and their stories. No one patient is the same, and we can't just assume that they can all be treated the same way and they'll get better, this will only make the situation worse. We are so used to living this comfortable life that we can't even entertain the idea of leaving, and living in one of these nations. As someone that wishes to pursue a career in the medical field, I want to follow Farmer's example and leave a true impact in the world. We must stop being selfish and get out of the mindset that if we donate money to a charity or a nation in need that we have done everything we can. We need people that will take a stand and go out and do the fieldwork and accept the responsibility of helping these nations get out of the poverish and unhealthy states that they are in today.

Anonymous said...

People in wealthier nations don't realize how lucky they are. They have enough to survive, and some more than that. It is their responsibility to help the poor nations, because they can provide them with the necessities they need in order to live. Wealthy people don't realize how much of a difference they can make, even by just giving something. People don't need to donate tons of money, but if every person gave something, it would make a significant improvement.
The best way to express or act on this sense of responsibility is to make them fully aware of what people in countries like Haiti are going through, and how much they're suffering. They need to know how badly each person is living, and how many people are painfully dying from deadly diseases daily. If they became educated on this situation, more and more people would do as much as they can to help these people, improving their lives.

Anonymous said...

Every individual in wealthier nations should always feel a responsibility to help the poor. Although, I don't think its beneficial to just send money to the government of poor countries. Due to the fact that the money you send will not go to feeding the poor, it mostly stays with government officials. Who just use it to fill their selfish needs. That is why I like Farmers approach of helping the poor. He actually took time out of his life to meet patients, have face to face interactions with them, and even give them gifts during their recovery from an illness. I personally think that the hands on volunteer opportunities is very rewarding. Now it’s good that we have many people in the world that donate money to organizations to help the poor. But this people also need to step out of their comfort bubble to actually visit the countries their money go to. Its good to donate, but its also good to actually see the faces of the people that your money goes to. Which to me must have been the best part of Farmer's job. It always made him happy to see the patients that under normal circumstances would have not died survive.

Nicole Britto said...

Hi my name is Nicole and I think we should and like we've talked about in my communication class we need to communicate better with different cultures. If everyone knew more about the other cultures that are out there and in trouble which is what Farmer does. He helps people in Haiti and through this story people are learning more about people in troubled cultures.

Anonymous said...

I believe that wealthier nations have the responsibility to aid the countries that are not able to prosper as we do. We should not just send over money to these countries but go in and help them as Farmer did. Farmer went into these countries and helped personally, although it is just one person, it is one person that can make a difference.

Anonymous said...

I agree with one of the comments about wealth vs. poor. People are born into wealthy or poor families and it isn't a choice at all for them. I agree with the fact that people shouldn't have to suffer because they were dealt a "bad hand". The Haitians obviously would like to get an education and make enough money to have an actual home and food every night. However, they do not have time to get an education because they need to help in order to keep themselves and their family alive.

It's obvious that a way to start to fix things in Haiti is to send money. However, I think that it is more effective to physically help out in Haiti. I understand that it isn't easy to hop on the next plane to Haiti, but people who would willingly volunteer to help build homes for them and help educate them would be a lot more effective. It's a lot to ask for, but it is not impossible.
-Cassie Genung

Nicole Britto said...

I agree in order to help Haiti we need to do more then just hand over money and hoping that that fixes their problems. We need to do more and such as teach the Haitians how to care for one another by giving them an education. The Haitians need to be education on how to survive and stay alive. We can't all be like Farmer and be away from our families for most of the year to help out.

Chris Hook said...

Hi, my name is Chris Hook. I am a freshman majoring in Kinesiology. As a wealthy country, we do have a responsibility to help out those of less fortune. Although, that does not necessarily mean we should be guilted into it. Helping others should be a natural tendency and something everyone should WANT to do. I was once given the greatest advice I have ever received: "Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for a lifetime." Given this, continuing to ship our resources into other countries is not the best way to go about helping them. Teach them efficient ways to survive and build a healthy government would be the best way to help those in need.

Sydney Duquette said...

Hi I am Sydney Duquette and I am from Lincoln Rhode Island. The area in which I live in, is considered to be one of the wealthier parts of my town. And before going further into my post, I would like to bring up the point that there is people within the US and not only in foreign countries, that live in poor areas and are not that well off either. Take my town for example, I may live in a wealthy neighborhood, but a few streets over is a neighborhood that would be considered the "ghetto" of lincoln. I don't think that I am any better than those people who live in the poorer neighborhoods of my town, and I am even friends with them from school. But I have always taken notice that they don't have alot of the things that I have. But that doesn't mean that I should be ashamed for the technologies I own, or the clothes that I wear, because I have had jobs, and I earned what I own. I understand that their parents may not be well-off, there can be family issues, and other things that alot of people have no idea about. I don't want anyone to think that I am stuck-up or insensitive to the people who are not that wealthy, because I am. I hope to do something with my career later in life that can help people in need. Relating all that I have said to this prompt, I don't think that wealthier people have any "responsibilities" to the people in poor countries. Because as much as people think it is selfish and arrogant to have a lot of money, or have a lot of food, when people don't have any of either, it's just your life. You didn't wish for those poor people to be poor, you can't blame yourself for other people that you don't knows misfortunes. But I do believe that if you have a heart, it is always a nice thing to either donate to charity, send packages including things they need like clothes, food, etc. or to even go to foreign countries and join certain groups who help them. Wealthy people should not feel responsible for those who are not wealthy, but they can always help.

Crystin R said...

Hi, my name is Crystin and I am a freshmen here at URI. I think that the wealthier people should deffinitely have the responsibility for the poor. People in poor countries need a lot of help.I think that people should try to do something instead of just sitting around and watching what is happening to other poor countries like Haiti. I liked Framers work and what he did in the book, Mountains Beyond Mountains. He actually went there and cured the ill without charging them anything. Not only he cured them but her also had a good personal relationship with them. He became close to them because he knew what they were going through.

I think that the wealthier nations should help the poor. It's not just about the money but other things as well. For example they should donate books, clothes, food, and many other things. Also, the person should go there to see what it is actually they are going through and try to live their life and compare it to how you live here. I think that is the most important thing is to put yourself in someone else's place.

Nicole Britto said...

I agree that the wealthier people and wealthier nations should help out the poorer nations/people. but the responsibility shouldn't just fall on the wealthier people but everyone in the nation. People all over should try and help each because we all live on this planet and in some way are all alike. We should be helping out other nations any way we can wether it's by giving them money, our time, books, clothing, etc.

Anonymous said...

“What responsibilities do you think individuals in wealthier nations have towards people in poor countries? What do you think is the best way to express or act on this sense of responsibility?” Is the question posed. As a psychology major I believe that people in wealthier nations should be helping the people in poor countries. This would ultimately make the world stronger as a whole which really should be the goal. I think that people should learn about these less fortunate countries, really figuring out what the people need and then act upon that. If they need people to be sent over to help, do that. If they just need resources and food so they can accomplish these tasks themselves, that should be done as well.

Anonymous said...

Hello, my name is Devin D’Amico and I am currently a freshman majoring in psychology, but hope to change majors to sociology. Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder was a very interesting book to read. We were able to have a personal story to teach us what is truly going on in Haiti. When the author met Paul Farmer, it had changed is life forever. He viewed the world differently. After reading the book, I as well have a found new meaning about life and it should not be taken advantage because there are many that are less fortunate then me. I also started to question myself, “Do I really want to study psychology.” The book made me take second thoughts and so did my communications class. I volunteered for a community service event where I had to work with children here on campus. I loved every second of it and felt over joyed when the young students did not want to leave without saying good-by. A question came to mind, “Do I want to work with children?” Now I am second-guessing myself and not sure where to go from here. The book Mountains Beyond Mountains made me feel like I should be reaching for a greater mission in life.

Anonymous said...

Hello, I am Devin D’Amico and currently a freshman here at URI. I really enjoyed how personal Farmer was with all of his patients. Joe the drug addict was not a smart man, or took very good care of himself. Farmer made sure he felt comfortable in his surroundings and helped fine him a homeless shelter that will make sure he takes his medicine and eats properly. Farmer always put his patients first and made sure they were well taken care of. He also tries to get to the bottom of everything. There were ten patients found with MDR and did not take to the medicine. Farmer insisted they come to Boston to get tested to figure out this usual pattern.

Cassandra Cangiano said...

I believe that every individual in wealthier nations should always feel a responsibility to help the less fortunate. Although, i don't think its beneficial to just said send money to the government of poor countries. Due to fact that the money you send will not go to feeding the poor, it mostly stays with government officials (who just use it to fill their selfish needs). That is why i like Framers approach of helping the poor. He actually took time out of his life to meet patients, have face to face interactions with them, and even give them gifts during their recovery from an illness. I think more people should have Farmers attitude towards life.

Anonymous said...

HI I'm Cindy and I'm a psychology student. I think that the privileges of affluence and influence comes with the responsibility to other struggling nations. People acquire knowledge and resources not only for self benefit, but to also share those who need it. I agree with the fact that there is a sense of generosity and selflessness that comes with success. I can understand that Paul Farmer felt that he could not feel satisfied with his life unless he shared his wealth and talents with those less fortunate. People sacrifice so much in order to achieve their academic, intellectual, and personal goals. I think that the act of helping others in any way possible once people have reached these goals is a way of making up for all of those sacrifices. It is a way to satisfy yourself morally.

Anonymous said...

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Anonymous said...

Hi I am an undecided major. I think that people who are more fortunate should definitely help the poor. Even it is just a small donation or a small act of kindness the least bit counts. They are appreciative for anything that they can get because it is better then what they have. The first step in doing this is spreading awareness about it. If people do not know about it then they may not think to help. If they know about it and learn about it they will see the struggles the poor go through and how they need support and guidance. Although money does help it can only help so much or for so long. They need advise and help along with it.

-Olivia Bazirgan

Mike said...

I think most people here are having a tough time differentiating between "wealthier nations" and the upper-class. There are still extremely poor people in the wealthiest nations, who can barely afford support their own family, never mind send money to another. I think that individuals do not have any responsibilities to people in poor countries. NATIONS however, or at least the wealthier ones, should assist in the recovery of struggling nations. I feel that if we utilized global organizations, as a vehicle to foster international support, we can achieve so much more. If every nation deemed "wealthy" agreed to allocate a certain percent of their GDP to fund relief efforts in developing nations, we could streamline the process of charity that much more.

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